STATIC VIDEO IMAGES OF AIR RAID SIRENS CONTRAST WITH THE ARCADIAN SOUND OF BIRDSONG PERMEATING THE GALLERY. TV SCREENS ARE ELEVATED ON ROUGH AND READY SCAFFOLDING, CREATING A ROBUST YET ENIGMATIC INSTALLATION.

The installation consists of five elevated monitors displaying images of sirens set against the almost unchanging skies and playing barely audible ambient sound (wind, birds, and the occasional vehicle) from the great plains of the US. As you wander amongst the videos you need only know that the sirens were installed early in the Cold War to warn of an imminent nuclear attack.
Stan Denniston is a photo-artist from Toronto whose work has always revolved around the themes of travel, memory and representation. For a decade, beginning in the late 1980’s, he explored the idea of photography as very unstable evidence - fiction even. His work has been exhibited at the National Gallery of Canada, the Art Gallery of Ontario, and most recently in La Biennale de Montréal. He has also exhibited in France, the Netherlands and Prospect ‘96 in Frankfurt. Denniston is one of the artists the cultural theorist Jeanne Randolph wrote about in Psychoanalysis and Synchronised Swimming, 1991, and in Symbolism and Its Discontents, 1997 both published by YYZ Books Toronto. This is his first exhibition in Britain.